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No.

22

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Wisconsin Swiss

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No, the moon is not made out of Swiss cheese. However, its surface does bear a striking resemblance to that of this crater-filled, ivory-white cheese. The tradition of making Swiss cheese in 200-pound wheels began in the Middle Ages when cheesemakers were taxed on the number of pieces they produced rather than total weight.

The Flavor

Mellow, buttery, and nutty.

The Pairings

When it comes to beverages, Swiss is anything but neutral. It plays nice with Riesling, cabernet sauvignon, merlot, and weiss beers.

No.

21

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Wisconsin Provolone

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A cheese closely related to Mozzarella, let’s say its first cousin, Provolone is distinguishable by its fuller flavors achieved through the use of more cultures. Early cheesemakers used ropes to hang and cure Provolone, then reused the ropes to transport it by horseback. Provolone comes in both smoked and unsmoked varieties.

Wisconsin Provolone

The Flavor

Slightly tart when young, growing sharper with age.

The Pairings

Nothing puts a smile on Provolone’s face like Beaujolais, Syrah, port, or a frosty pint of your favorite pale ale.

No.

20

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Wisconsin Pepper Jack

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Often considered the third cousin twice removed of Monterey Jack, Pepper Jack cheese is flecked with chopped chilies, typically green and red jalapeño peppers. Pepper Jack often finds a home in Mexican dishes such as quesadillas.

Wisconsin Pepper Jack

The Flavor

Levels of “hot” vary. Has a zesty kick with the fresh flavor of the chilies. Overtones of the mellow and buttery flavor of Monterey Jack.

The Pairings

Can often be found walking hand in hand with Chianti, merlot, pinot gris, or a robust lager.

No.

19

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Wisconsin Parmesan

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Although you won’t see it wearing a crown, Parmesan is considered the king of Italian-style cheeses. Adding life to many dishes, its flavor intensifies with age. While commonly grated and melted into food, Parmesan also works well as a table cheese. Wisconsin cheesemakers lead the U.S. in the production of award-winning Parmesans.

Wisconsin Parmesan

The Flavor

Buttery, sweet, and nutty. Intensifies with age.

The Pairings

If you want to show your taste buds your pairing expertise, Parmesan goes best with Chianti, merlot, Madeira, and stout beers.

No.

18

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Wisconsin Mozzarella

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What’s tasty and weighs 850 million pounds? All the Mozzarella cheese produced by Wisconsin cheesemakers in a given year. An Italian favorite, this cheese gained popularity in America following World War II as vets returned home with a craving for the pizzas they ate while overseas.

Wisconsin Mozzarella

The Flavor

Mild, delicate, and milky.

The Pairings

If you love Mozzarella, you’ll love it even more with a glass of Beaujolais, chardonnay, or a pilsner beer.

No.

17

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Wisconsin Monterey Jack

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How does a cheese get a great surname like Jack? Leave it to a Scotsman. Named after David Jacks who first produced it in the 1890s, Wisconsin Monterey Jack is available in a wide variety of flavors, including dill, garlic, hot pepper, pesto, wild morel, leek, lemon, and peppercorn, to name a few.

Wisconsin Monterey Jack

The Flavor

Varies greatly with variety, but is generally buttery, creamy, and slightly tart.

The Pairings

You can’t go wrong when you pair Monterey Jack with wines like Beaujolais and merlot, and beers from the pilsner and brown ale families.

No.

16

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Wisconsin Limburger

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Famous for its pungent tendencies, this brave and bold Belgian cheese does nothing but intensify with age. Limburger was created to complement the highly flavored meats commonly eaten in Belgium and Germany. Today, a single cheese plant in Monroe, Wisconsin produces all the surface-ripened Limburger made in the United States.

Wisconsin Limburger

The Flavor

Earthy and pungent. Intensity increases with age.

The Pairings

Nothing says “match made in Heaven” like some Limburger cheese and a glass of cabernet sauvignon or a pint of porter.

No.

15

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Wisconsin Havarti

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Raise your hand if you have a heart for Havarti. Smooth, supple, and originally from Denmark, it’s been perfected by Wisconsin cheesemakers. A special Wisconsin-style Havarti was developed at the University of Wisconsin and is firmer and more buttery than other varieties.

Wisconsin Havarti

The Flavor

Buttery, creamy, and slightly acidic.

The Pairings

What do red zinfandel, sauvignon blanc, merlot, and pilsner beer all have in common? They all go well with Havarti.

No.

14

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Wisconsin Gruyère

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Any cheese with an accent mark must be tasty. Gruyère originated in the Alpine region between France and Switzerland around the 11th century. Today, Wisconsin produces Gruyère using classic techniques involving handcrafted copper vats. Scrumptious when young, it becomes increasingly sweet, nutty, and granular with age.

The Flavor

Nutty, rich, sweet, and full-bodied. Flavors increase with age.

The Pairings

Only a select few beverages know Gruyère up close and personal, like Syrah, merlot, port, and full-bodied lager or stout.

No.

13

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Wisconsin Gouda

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If you think wooden shoes are the only thing to come from Holland, think again. Gouda was first produced there more than 800 years ago. Both the age and flavor of Gouda can be determined by the color of the wax casing: red suggests mild, yellow or clear suggests aged or flavored, and black or brown suggests smoked.

Wisconsin Gouda

The Flavor

Light, buttery, and nutty.

The Pairings

Which beverages are the lucky recipients of its affection? Sauvignon blanc, pinot gris, brandy, and, of course, stout and lager beers.

No.

12

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Wisconsin Gorgonzola

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Almost older than time itself, Gorgonzola has been made since 879 A.D. Gorgonzola is a creamy ivory color with penetrating greenish blue streaks throughout. This cheese is typically produced in flatter wheels than traditional Blue cheeses. Wisconsin Gorgonzolas are known for their exceptional creaminess.

Wisconsin Gorgonzola

The Flavor

An earthy flavor that is slightly sharp.

The Pairings

Won’t give just any old beverage the time, but pairs nicely with red zinfandel, pinot noir, merlot, scotch, or a stout beer.

No.

11

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Wisconsin Fresh Mozzarella

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Mild, tasty, and always a crowd-pleaser, Fresh Mozzarella should be eaten when only a few days old. So what are you waiting for? Submerged in water to maintain its freshness, Fresh Mozzarella is a creamy white color and usually kneaded, then stretched and formed into balls or logs before being sold.

Wisconsin Fresh Mozzarella

The Flavor

Delicate, milky, and mild.

The Pairings

Lives happily ever after with wines such as Beaujolais, pinot gris, and chardonnay. Isn’t afraid to get friendly with fruit beers.

No.

10

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Wisconsin Fontina

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When it comes to culinary versatility, Fontina is a jack-of-all-trades. While it originated in Italy, Fontina is produced in different variations across the globe. In Wisconsin, cheesemakers produce Italian, Swedish, and Danish styles of Fontina.

Wisconsin Fontina

The Flavor

Danish and Swedish styles are slightly tart and nutty, with light, earthy flavors. Italian styles taste mild, earthy, and buttery.

The Pairings

Loves a romantic evening with Beaujolais, pinot noir, chardonnay, and even a pint of bock or stout.

No.

9

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Wisconsin Feta

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If you have a dish that needs some pizzazz, give Feta a call. Wisconsin cheesemakers make world-class Feta using cow’s milk. Fresh Feta is packaged in brine to help preserve the cheese. There are many varieties of Feta, including herbs and dill, tomato, basil, black pepper, and garlic, to name just a few.

Wisconsin Feta

The Flavor

Almost always salty and tangy, Feta is mild and creamy when young, becoming peppery and complex with age.

The Pairings

It’s picky when it comes to picking its partners. Enjoys the company of pinot gris, Riesling, weiss beer, and a hardworking lager.

No.

8

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Wisconsin Cheese Curds

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You haven’t truly lived until you’ve finished off an entire bag of Wisconsin Cheese Curds all by your lonesome. So what are Cheese Curds? They’re simply fresh cheese – most commonly Cheddar – in its natural, random shape and form before being processed into blocks and aged. And yes, they are tasty.

Wisconsin Cheese Curds

The Flavor

A mild taste with a slightly rubbery texture. Fresh Cheese Curds should squeak when eaten.

The Pairings

If it’s cold, thirst-quenching, and served in a glass, it probably goes well with Cheese Curds. So enjoy them with whatever you desire.

No.

7

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Wisconsin Cheddar

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Leading the nation in producing this captivating cheese, Wisconsin is the Cheddar Capital of the U.S. Aromatic and complex, Cheddar can be aged over ten years. Aging increases sharpness and allows different flavors and textures to develop.

The Flavor

Rich, nutty, and smooth when young, it becomes increasingly sharp, complex, and crumbly with age.

The Pairings

Goes hand in hand with wines such as cabernet sauvignon and pinot gris. Loves most beers, and spirits like scotch.

No.

6

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Wisconsin Camembert

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A true taste seductress, Camembert has a silky inside with a bloomy white rind that ripens the cheese from the outside in. As Camembert ages, the rind develops golden reddish markings, a useful tool for identifying the best time to indulge. For best flavor and texture, bring Camembert to room temperature prior to serving.

Wisconsin Camembert

The Flavor

From mild to pungent, depending on age. Always rich, it sometimes has a hint of earthy mushroom flavors.

The Pairings

Which lucky beverages might you see Camembert rubbing shoulders with? Try Syrah, pinot noir, port, and fruit beers.

No.

5

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Wisconsin Butterkäse

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Your mouth won’t know what hit it when you bite into this tasty cheese treat. Just like the Deutschlanders who created it, Butterkäse is one hearty cheese. Named for its butter-like texture, Butterkäse is a delicately flavored, odorless cheese. It’s semisoft and easily melts into many of your favorite dishes, as well as your mouth.

Wisconsin Butterkäse

The Flavor

Mild, buttery, and delicate.

The Pairings

Chardonnay, brandy, or a pilsner or lager. It’s fair to assume that this cheese doesn’t befriend just any beverage.

No.

4

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Wisconsin Brie

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A delicious French-style cheese that’s loved by beret-wearing guys named Pierre, Brie has found a new home with Wisconsin cheesemakers. Brie is soft and creamy with a bloomy edible rind. In Wisconsin, Brie is also produced with added flavors such as herbs and black pepper.

Wisconsin Brie

The Flavor

Soft, creamy, rich, and memorable with a hint of earthy mushroom flavors.

The Pairings

Loves to spend quality time with champagne, Beaujolais, and tasty fruit beers. Has an affinity for Madeira as well.

No.

3

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Wisconsin Brick

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When looking up the word “delicious” in the dictionary, don’t be surprised if you see a picture of Brick cheese right next to it. Originating in Wisconsin and resembling a brick, it’s a smooth-textured cheese that is ivory to creamy yellow in color. Brick comes in three varieties: mild, aged, and dry rind.

The Flavor

Changes from mild and sweet with a touch of nuttiness when young, to pungent and tangy when aged.

The Pairings

Gets along swimmingly with merlot and pinot noir. Appreciates the company of a hearty bock, porter, or stout.

No.

2

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Wisconsin Blue

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When biting into a piece of Blue, prepare for a rush of flavor, aroma, and unprecedented feelings of cheese joy. Named for its blue veins, Blue cheese ranges from firm and crumbly to slightly creamy in texture. Blue cheese is aged longer than 60 days for a bolder and more expressive flavor experience.

The Flavor

Pleasantly sharp with earthy flavors. Some varieties are salty with hints of pepper.

The Pairings

Looking to impress your taste buds? Blue matches perfectly with red zinfandel, a nice porter, or Madeira.

No.

1

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Wisconsin Asiago

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Say ciao to a classic taste that originated in the country shaped like a boot. Asiago is a firm cheese that can be served medium, or aged to develop sharper flavors. Often grated over food, Asiago also makes an excellent dessert cheese when paired with walnuts and dried apricots.

Wisconsin Asiago

The Flavor

Changes from mild when young to sharp, buttery, and nutty when aged.

The Pairings

Show your mouth you care. Pair Asiago with cabernet sauvignon, merlot, a brown ale, or scotch if you so dare.

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